AI art and biohacks that ponder post-humanism, CGI fever dreams that (further) distort reality, software that speaks truth to power: HOLO Readers enjoy full access to our weird and wonderful discoveries at the nexus of art, science, technology, and culture. Join us and support indie publishing in the process.
“There’s a prevailing narrative in society that it’s all or nothing—you’re a winner or a loser. It’s Trumpian and driven by the greed of glassy-eyed decentralized gamblers who are afraid if a project doesn’t sell out, their pathetic investment is in peril.”
Kevin Abosch, Irish conceptual artist and crypto pundit, on NFT artists (all too often) working against the clock
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OUT NOW:
Michael Century
Northern Sparks
A history of how hosting Expo 67 and innovative cultural policies kicked off a golden age in Canadian art and technology
“He was homeless for quite a long time during his life, and he really struggled with alcoholism. He had no interest in art at all, and then one day he went into an exhibition to get out of the rain.”
– Kim Noble, art instructor of the late George Westren, whose op art legacy was recently saved by artist neighbour Alan Warburton. “The exhibit was the work of Bridget Riley,” writer Sydney Page notes. “Westren was inspired by her.”

An intimate view into his ongoing efforts to automate his practice, Jonas Lund’s “Walk with Me” opens on the distant.gallery social platform. The online exhibition collages early and recent experiments of “wrapping his distributed identity, personality traits, and musical interludes” layered with instructions to make his artworks into a single glorious browser canvas, that Lund compares to “being inside the artist’s brain itself.”

“Digital sculptures live in the now, in a future that never ages. The physical object is the archive. That object was digital, but now it is real, pinned to a certain moment, and it can travel through different times and contexts as long as it exists.”
– Sculptor Auriea Harvey, on working across worlds and mediums. “The actual sculpture is the digital model on my computer,” she insists. “That is the real sculpture.”
Dossiers
General
A new HOLO format, Dossiers are web-based research publications that contextualize and expand upon cultural initiatives in real-time

Dossiers are dedicated HOLO folios that augment and complement exhibitions, residencies, conferences, and educational initiatives. Realised in collaboration with artists, writers, curators, and cultural partners, they are designed to document process and disseminate knowledge through a variety of engaging formats—essays, interviews, artwork—all within a focused online magazine. If you’re interested in working with us on a Dossier, please get in touch via our Contact page.

Encounters
AI art and biohacks, CGI fever dreams, software that speaks truth to power—join us and receive full access to HOLO’s daily discoveries in critical creative practice.
$40 / $75 / $350
Nora N. Khan assembles a cast of luminaries to consider the far-reaching implications of AI and computational culture.
$40
236 pages on artist-in-residence programs at scientific institutes, VR’s latent potential, and a deep dive into the extremely weird history of random number generation
$40
A BESTIARY OF THE ANTHROPOCENE is an illustrated compilation of hybrid creatures of our time, equally inspired by medieval bestiaries and observations of our damaged planet.
$35
The first three instalments of ‘anticipatory’ designers N O R M A L S eponymous graphic novel series delineates a dark and unsettling world of hyper-mediated futures.
$65
226 pages on an original digital art gallerist, the fascinating history of a powerful visual programming langauge, and an extended inquiry into how augmented vision is warping ‘seeing’ and ‘being seen’
$35

Emerging trajectories in art, science, and technology (since 2012)

As an editorial and curatorial platform, HOLO explores disciplinary interstices and entangled knowledge as epicentres of critical creative practice, radical imagination, research, and activism

“I feel the language and concepts I’m working with don’t comfortably fit within the normal discourse about art and aesthetics. CERN’s physicists and engineers understood the tools I was using and I was able to talk about my goals. I just couldn’t have that kind of dialogue in an art context.”—sound artist Bill Fontana on his CERN residency (HOLO 2, p.206)

There is a space between a computer’s command line interface and the contemporary art museum, the legalese of Silicon Valley’s terms and conditions and the social contract, the whoosh of a particle accelerator and the romanticized “a ha” of artistic inspiration. For much of the twentieth century these gaps were chasms, separating science and engineering from the humanities and siloing them off; today, these gaps are narrowing and disciplinary interstices are the spaces to watch. Increasingly aware of how much technology governs not only entrenched fields of study but every aspect of modern life, we’ve come to realise that things are deeply intertwined.

HOLO emerged in 2012 to explore these entanglements—first with a periodical, now across an expanded platform. Set up in the grey zones between art, science, and technology, it frames scientific research and emerging technologies as being more than sites of invention and innovation—as epicentres of critical creative practice, radical imagination, and activism. The artists and designers working with related materials—algorithms and microcontrollers, meteoroids and fungi, data and archives—aren’t just updating notions of craft for the twenty-first century, they are researchers and cultural critics.

As an editorial and curatorial platform, HOLO occupies the same eccentric vantage points as these hybrid creative practices and puts them into perspective. Working across multiple avenues—print and online, events and production—HOLO collaborates with contributors and cultural partners to facilitate fruitful dialogue between domains and bring new voices into the conversation.

Selected collaborators:

© 2022 HOLO V2.5.1 (beta)
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HOLO
PO Box 59038
Toronto, Canada
M6R 3B5

We produce:

Artist talks
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Performances
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Editorial
Publications

Over the last decade HOLO has curated more than 500 cultural initiatives worldwide

Selected partners:

A-B-Z-TXTCA
ACCKR
ArtengineCA
BIANCA
Circle of LightRU
Digital CulturesPL
EyeoUS
EyebeamUS
FRAMEDJP
IAMES
iMALBE
InterAccessCA
MappingCH
MUTEKCA
NODEDE
ResonateSR
RhizomatiksJP
Sónar+DES
UAL CCLUK

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