AI art and biohacks that ponder post-humanism, CGI fever dreams that (further) distort reality, software that speaks truth to power: HOLO Readers enjoy full access to our weird and wonderful discoveries at the nexus of art, science, technology, and culture. Join us and support indie publishing in the process.
“A dreamy Edisonian wonderland awaits, where a rolling landscape of electrical conduits and vintage-style lightbulbs undulates like waves, or like gentle hills or playground jungle gyms.”
– Art critic Shana Nys Dambrot, describing Nancy Holt’s Electrical Systems (1982) at Sprüth Magers Los Angeles. “It feels good to see this erasure being corrected,” Dambrot says of the inclusion of 1960s photo series by the land artist, noting similar work by Holt’s male peers has (historically) received more attention.
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OUT NOW:
Metalabel x co—matter
After the Creator Economy
A physical and digital zine with contributors including Amber Case, Kei Kreutler, and Mat Dryhurst exploring new ways to produce, distribute, and monetize creative work online
“Abstain from romanticized post-rationalizations.”
– Software artist Karsten Schmidt, in “Personal Considerations for Creating Generative Art,” an itemized collection of methods and models to aid algorithmic creativity. Not a dogmatist, he notes his suggestions are “fluid, incomplete, and highly subjective.”
“…I am prone to circumnavigate video installations. Are monitors curved or flat, LED or liquid crystal? Power cords—are they a tangle, discreetly bundled, altogether hidden?”
– Artist and educator Sowon Kwon, sharing her rubric for evaluating the installation of video-based work, in an attentive review of Paul Pfeiffer’s Red Green Blue (2022) at Paula Cooper Gallery

“Chronos/Synthesis,” a solo show by Canadian artist Oliver Pauk, opens at Toronto’s J Spot Gallery. For the window gallery show, Pauk presents an array of 3D printed, CNC milled, and hand carved sculptures alongside video and AR works. The selection underscores two driving interests: rendering pure digital form, and his efforts “to replicate the patterns and aesthetics of automated, computerized processes” in more traditional mediums (image: Object #90, 2017).

Serials
Wade Wallerstein Decodes Digital Art’s Myriad “Distant Early Warnings”
Maarten Vanden Eynde Encapsulates Human Fallibility for the Ages
Miriam Arbus Cultivates “Seed Systems” That Nurture New XR Ecologies
Martin Bricelj Baraga Builds Monuments to the Sky’s 53 Shades of Blue
Claire L. Evans Assembles Fifty Key Sci-Fi Voices to “Terraform” Futurity
Kyriaki Goni Weaves Counter-Narratives to Colonial Cosmologies and Space Expansionism
Yuri Suzuki Broadcasts the “Sound of the Earth” at Triennale Milano and in Your Headphones
Megan MacLaurin Foregrounds “The Air We Share” by Taking GIF Art to the Streets
Jeremy Bolen Casts Haunting Artifacts That Capture the Future-History of the Climate Crisis
Mindy Seu Forges Deep Links Between Cyberfeminism, Net Art, and Web3
Dossiers
General
A new HOLO format, Dossiers are web-based research publications that contextualize and expand upon cultural initiatives in real-time

Dossiers are dedicated HOLO folios that augment and complement exhibitions, residencies, conferences, and educational initiatives. Realised in collaboration with artists, writers, curators, and cultural partners, they are designed to document process and disseminate knowledge through a variety of engaging formats—essays, interviews, artwork—all within a focused online magazine. If you’re interested in working with us on a Dossier, please get in touch via our Contact page.

Encounters
AI art and biohacks, CGI fever dreams, software that speaks truth to power—join us and receive full access to HOLO’s daily discoveries in critical creative practice.
$40 / $75 / $350
Questioning our problematic faith in AI, Nora N. Khan and fifteen luminaries measure the gap between machine learning hypotheticals and the mess of lived experience.
$40
An inquiry into the nature of randomness—how science explains it and how culture (and art) emerges from it
$45
An illustrated field guide on plastiglomerates, robot dogs, antenna trees and other hybrid creatures (and objects) of our time
$35
The first three instalments of ‘anticipatory’ designers N O R M A L S eponymous graphic novel series delineate a dark and unsettling world of hyper-mediated futures.
$65
Parsing emerging representational and perceptual paradigms in the wake of the Snowden revelations and nascent computer vision technologies
$75

Emerging trajectories in art, science, and technology (since 2012)

As an editorial and curatorial platform, HOLO explores disciplinary interstices and entangled knowledge as epicentres of critical creative practice, radical imagination, research, and activism

“I feel the language and concepts I’m working with don’t comfortably fit within the normal discourse about art and aesthetics. CERN’s physicists and engineers understood the tools I was using and I was able to talk about my goals. I just couldn’t have that kind of dialogue in an art context.”—sound artist Bill Fontana on his CERN residency (HOLO 2, p.206)

There is a space between a computer’s command line interface and the contemporary art museum, the legalese of Silicon Valley’s terms and conditions and the social contract, the whoosh of a particle accelerator and the romanticized “a ha” of artistic inspiration. For much of the twentieth century these gaps were chasms, separating science and engineering from the humanities and siloing them off; today, these gaps are narrowing and disciplinary interstices are the spaces to watch. Increasingly aware of how much technology governs not only entrenched fields of study but every aspect of modern life, we’ve come to realise that things are deeply intertwined.

HOLO emerged in 2012 to explore these entanglements—first with a periodical, now across an expanded platform. Set up in the grey zones between art, science, and technology, it frames scientific research and emerging technologies as being more than sites of invention and innovation—as epicentres of critical creative practice, radical imagination, and activism. The artists and designers working with related materials—algorithms and microcontrollers, meteoroids and fungi, data and archives—aren’t just updating notions of craft for the twenty-first century, they are researchers and cultural critics.

As an editorial and curatorial platform, HOLO occupies the same eccentric vantage points as these hybrid creative practices and puts them into perspective. Working across multiple avenues—print and online, events and production—HOLO collaborates with contributors and cultural partners to facilitate fruitful dialogue between domains and bring new voices into the conversation.

Selected collaborators:

© 2022 HOLO V2.5.1 (beta)
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HOLO
PO Box 59038
Toronto, Canada
M6R 3B5

We produce:

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Over the last decade HOLO has curated more than 500 cultural initiatives worldwide

Selected partners:

A-B-Z-TXTCA
ACCKR
ArtengineCA
BIANCA
Circle of LightRU
Digital CulturesPL
EyeoUS
EyebeamUS
FRAMEDJP
IAMES
iMALBE
InterAccessCA
MappingCH
MUTEKCA
NODEDE
ResonateSR
RhizomatiksJP
Sónar+DES
UAL CCLUK

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